Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Provide Access to Education for Children in Malawi

As the situation worsens, the need for educating children and helping them develop job skills becomes even more important. “The parents here want their children to go to school,” explains Fr. Peter White, a Missionary working in Dedza — a town in central Malawi. “They have come together and have begun clearing out an abandoned building that we will use for building classrooms for a primary school.”


“Whatever good things we build -- end up building us.”

James Rohn (1930-2009)

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect our daily routines, your ongoing support for our Missionaries and those we serve remains critical. Without your kindness and caring, very little of what needs to be done in our missions could actually be accomplished. Quite honestly, your generosity provides food for the hungry, clean water for those who are thirsty, shelter for the homeless, education for orphans and so much more. How incredibly grateful we are for all that you do!

Gutting an old building to create new classrooms and meeting rooms.

Here in the U.S., the autumn season is underway. Schools are back in session, and students are meeting either in-person or virtually. This morning, though, as I read through some of the letters and correspondence I receive from numerous priests, religious sisters and brothers, and lay missionaries working throughout Africa, I am reminded that some children still are not able to go to school. It isn’t because they do not want to go or because of the global pandemic. The reason that they cannot go to school is because they do not have a school! Please read on and I will explain.

Malawi, in East Africa, is one of the poorest nations in the world. The crisis is so deep rooted and widespread there that nearly 75% of Malawians live below poverty level — earning about $1 a day. Ongoing droughts brought on by climate change are making the situation even worse . . . with farmers not being able to grow enough food to sustain the economy or even feed their families.

Workers using the bricks made by the
community.

As the situation worsens, the need for educating children and helping them develop job skills becomes even more important. “The parents here want their children to go to school,” explains Fr. Peter White, a Missionary working in Dedza — a town in central Malawi. “They have come together and have begun clearing out an abandoned building that we will use for building classrooms for a primary school.”

“We have collected sand, made bricks, and have raised enough money to buy quarry stone for building. Even the little children — who will be students — have worked to help clear out the rubble. Our hope,” Fr. Peter continues, “is to raise money to purchase lumber, roofing materials, doors, windows, nails, gutters and downspouts, plaster and paint, and all of the other items to build the classrooms. The buildings will also be used as a place for travelers to stay overnight — just to be in from the elements. We will use them for conferences and community meetings as well.”

The parish choir (some of
the children hoping for the new classrooms)!

“The families here are working very hard to build what they can, but they are also extremely poor. They have given as much as they can but still need help buying the building materials. We are hoping that there is some way you can help us.”

Education is a vital component to alleviating poverty! Schools in our communities teach skills to our children in so many ways. Perhaps you can help your community’s school by volunteering to read to preschoolers or by donating gently used books to the school library. Please be sure to call before you go to ask about COVID safety protocols.

I also hope that you will send a donation to help Fr. Peter White’s mission in Malawi build the two classrooms they desperately need! While our hope is to raise at least $36,500 for the building materials as well as support other projects of the Missionaries of Africa, please know that any donation you send — no matter the amount — will be used to help those who are too poor to help themselves. God bless you for your kindness and caring!

 

Your Missionary Friend,

Denis P. Pringle
Director of Development